Costs

What are the costs?

As you can imagine it is a very expensive exercise holding an international event. Even the smaller ones are a major logistics exercise. Funding comes from a number of sources:

  • sponsorship
  • local chess community
  • registration fees
  • accompanying people and extra players

The first two are fairly obvious. The registration fee is an amount – around 100 euros for every person – players, accompanying adults, siblings. It covers providing the accreditation badges, the cost of transport to and from the airport and to and from hotels to venues. It also goes into the general budget.

The organising committee organises accommodation and food and charges a certain amount for all extra players and all accompanying people. It is compulsory to stay at the official hotel(s) for all players. The Australian delegation stays all together in the same hotel, where there is not a single hotel. People often look at what they are being charged and work out it is pretty expensive compared to what they could get if they booked themselves, particularly as it is usually out of season. However the profit on this food and accommodation is then used to fund the ‘free’ food and accommodation for the primary selected players and other tournament costs (venue hire, arbiters etc).

While it might seem a bit of a rip-off, it really isn’t as costs do have to be covered.

The important thing to remember when you go to one of these international tournaments is that it is not a holiday! Parents are asked by the management committee what accommodation they would like etc and it is very tempting to think you are booking a conventional holiday, with a bit of chess thrown in.

While the organizers are usually very keen to help delegations get the accommodation they want, they also have to make the whole event work and sometimes that means changing hotels or splitting people across different floors. Australia historically has been very good at being one of the first to book and pay for accommodation and that means they get treated well. The later it gets and the more stressed the organisers are, the more likely it is that delegations will get sub-standard accommodation. They also have to keep within budget and this often means skimping on food quality.

Some examples are Oropesa in the late 90s, where delegations booking late could not be accommodated at the main resort complex and were put in overflow accommodation 15 minutes away.

In Belfort in 2005, there were no major hotels and all the delegations were split over many hotels – some as far as 50km away!

If all goes well, you will be in a good hotel, but if you are not, then it is important to support each other and understand that the organizers have the right to allocate accommodation in such a way as to make the whole event work within budget.

Be prepared to buy meals outside if the food becomes boring or is inadequate and to pay for a taxi to supplement the transport if necessary. Do not expect to always get the level of accommodation or food that you are used to in Australia. Sometimes the tournaments are held in very poor countries and part of the fun of going to these tournaments is experiencing different cultures.

Generally, these are the costs to consider and can vary depending on inflation and currency exchange.

Primary Selections

  • Uniform: $60
  • Travel: $1,000 to $3,000
  • Registration fee: $170
  • Team Coaching: $700 *
  • Gifts: $10
  • Misc: $60
  • Total: $2,000 to $4,000

Secondary Selections

  • Uniform: $60
  • Travel: $1,000 to $3,000
  • Accomodation/Food: $1,200
  • Entry fee: $250
  • Registration fee: $170
  • Team Coaching: $700 *
  • Gifts: $10
  • Misc: $60
  • Total: $3,400 to $5,400

In addition to these are visa costs, getting a passport if necessary and any costs of accompanying children and parents.

* Coaching costs are indicative, but may vary considerably from this depending on the method of coaching you choose.